William Harbert

Professor

Contact

William Harbert
504 SRCC
4107 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15260

412-624-8874

Biography

Dr. William Harbert received his MS in Exploration Geophysics and Ph.D. in Geophysics from Stanford University. He is a life-time member of SEG, a registered professional petroleum geophysicist and member of AAPG and SPE. He has been a DOE ORISE Research Associate and a Resident Institute Fellow of the NETL-Institute for Advanced Energy Solution (IAES). He was a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the In Salah CO2 Injection Project facilitated by British Petroleum and is presently on the Altarock Review Board, which focuses on an enhanced geothermal power project funded by the United States Department of Energy. 

 

  • Research
  • Publications
  • Teaching

The research of this group is seismic analysis of microseismic, reflection seismic, VSP and fluid and structure using advanced processing and attributes. The group works to accurately image surface geometry using geophysical techniques and advanced geophysical processing. The goal of this research is to better understand subsurface structures, subsurface pore filling phases and topologies and dynamic processes at a variety of scales, from micro computer tomography (CT) scale to log response scale, to vertical seismic profile and cross well tomorgraphy scales and surface seismic response scale. 

Research Areas

Barbara Kutchko, Dustin Crandall, Johnathan Moore, Connor Gieger, Magdalena Gill, Igor Haljasmaa, Richard Spaulding, William Harbert, Alison Mergaman, Laura Dalton, Eilis Rosenbaum, Dustin Mcintyre, Glen Benge, Charles Buford, Joe Shine, 2015, Assessment of Pressurized Foamed Cement Used in Deep Offshore Wells, SPE, OTC-25994-MS.

R. Spaulding, I. Haljasmaama, C. Gieger, B. Kutchko, J. Fazio, G. DeBruijn, J.M. Shine, G. Benge,  W. Harbert, 2015, An Assessment of the Dynamic Modulus of Atmospherically Generated Foam Cements, SPE, OTC-25776-MS.

Rui Zhang, Donald Vasco, Thomas M. Daley, William Harbert, 2015, Characterization of a fracture zone using seismic attributes at the In Salah CO2 storage project, Interpretation, 3, SM37-SM46.

Wang, Pengyun, Pozzi, M., Small, M., and Harbert, W., 2015, Statistical method for real-time detection of changes in seismic risk at deep-well injection sites, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, v. 105, doi: 10.1785/0120150038.

Wang, Pengyun, Small, Mitchell, Harbert, W., and Pozzi, M., 2015, A Bayesian approach for assessing seismic transitions associated with wasterwater injections, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, (accepted and in-press).

Wang, Pengyun, Pozzi, M., Small, M., and Harbert, W., 2015, Statistical method for real-time detection of changes in seismic risk at deep-well injection sites, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, (accepted and in-press).

Rui Zhang, Donald Vasco, Thomas M. Daley, William Harbert, 2015, Characterization of a fracture zone using seismic attributes at the In Salah CO2 storage project, Interpretation, 3, SM37-SM46.

R. Spaulding, I. Haljasmaama, C. Gieger, B. Kutchko, J. Fazio, G. DeBruijn, J.M. Shine, G. Benge,  W. Harbert, 2015, An Assessment of the Dynamic Modulus of Atmospherically Generated Foam Cements, SPE, OTC-25776-MS.

Barbara Kutchko, Dustin Crandall, Johnathan Moore, Connor Gieger, Magdalena Gill, Igor Haljasmaa, Richard Spaulding, William Harbert, Alison Mergaman, Laura Dalton, Eilis Rosenbaum, Dustin Mcintyre, Glen Benge, Charles Buford, Joe Shine, 2015, Assessment of Pressurized Foamed Cement Used in Deep Offshore Wells, SPE, OTC-25994-MS.

Hammack, Richard W., Harbert, W., Sharma, Shikha, Stewart, Brian W., Capo, Rosemary C., Wall, Andy J., Wells, Arthur, Diehl, Rodney, Blaushild, David, Sams, James, and Veloski, Garret, 2014, An Evaluation of Fracture Growth and Gas/Fluid Migration as Horizontal Marcellus Shale Gas Wells are Hydraulically Fractured in Greene County, Pennsylvania, United States Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, NETL-TRS-3-2014, 80 pp..

Kutchko, Barbara, Moore, J., Gill, M., Haljasmaa, I., Spaulding, R., Harbert, W., Benge, G., Cunningham, E., Lawrence, D., DeBrujin, and Shine, J., 2014, Assessment of foamed cement used in deep offshore wells, SPE, SPE-170298-MS.

Carter, Kristin M., Schmidt, Katherine, W., Harbert, W., and Parrish, Jay B., 2014, Using geophysical and remote sensing techniques to evaluate deep geologic formations in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Geological Survey, Fourth Series, 12 p.

Karimi, Bobak, McQuarrie, Nadine, Lin, Jeen-Shang, and Harbert, W., 2014, Determining the geometry of the North Anatolian Fault east of the Marmara Sea through integrated stress modeling and remote sensing techniques, Tectonophysics, 623, p. 14-22.

Zorn, Erich V., Richard Hammack, and Harbert, W., SPE, 2013,  Time Dependent b and D-values, Scalar Hydraulic Diffusivity, and Seismic Energy from Microseismic Analysis in the Marcellus Shale: Connection to Pumping Behavior During Hydraulic Fracturing, SPE, SPE-168647-MS.

Hammack, Richard, Zorn, E., Harbert, W., Stewart, B., Sharma, S., and Siriwardane, H., 2013, An Evaluation of Zonal Isolation After Hydraulic Fracturing; Results From Horizontal Marcellus Shale Gas Wells at NETL’s Greene County Test Site in Southwestern Pennsylvania, SPE 13ERM-P-65-SPE.

Hur, Tae-Bong, Baltrus, J. P., Howard, B. H., Harbert, W. P., and Romanov, V. N., 2013, Carbonate Formation in Wyoming Montmorillonite under High Pressure Carbon Dioxide, International Journal of Green House Gases, v. 13, p. 149-155.

Harbert, W., Purcell, Christopher, and Mur, Alan, 2011, Seismic reflection data processing of 3D surveys over an EOR CO2 injection, Energy Procedia, v. 4, p. 3684-3690.

Mur, Alan, Purcell, C., Soong, Y., McLendon, T. Robert, Haljasmaa, I. V., Kutchko, B., Kennedy, S., and Harbert, W., 2011, Integration of core sample velocity measurements into a 4D seismic survey and analysis of SEM and CT images to obtain pore scale properties, Energy Procedia, v. 4, p. 3676-3683.

 

GEOL 1445 and 2449 GIS, GPS, and Computer Methods

​The goal of this course is to gain expertise in the methods of Geographic Information Systems using the GeoTRANS and ArcGIS software packages on PC based workstations. No previous computer classes are required. Students will be graded on the basis of approximately 5 computer assignments, in-class exercises, a project, and final exam. This course is a core course for the GIS Certificate.The goals of the GIS courses are to gain expertise in the methods of GIS through increasingly complex exercises.

Offered every Fall term and in the Summer if there is student demand. Lecture 3 hours.

GEOL 1446 and 2446 Adv GIS Systems & Computer Methods

The goal of this course is to continue to gain expertise in ARC/INFO GIS and computer workstations. Students will use GIS instruments to collect GIS data, import and export DEM and DLG data in a variety of format, be introduced to map projections, ModelBuilder models, and work with the TIN, grid, and network modules of ARC/INFO on computer workstations.  Graduate level courses include individual projects and course presentations often focused on thesis-related subject matter.

Offered every spring term. Lecture, 3 hours.

GEOL 1410 and 3410 Exploration Geophysics

Various geophysical techniques‑‑seismic, gravimetric, magnetic, and electro‑magnetic‑‑are frequently utilized in the exploration of the Earth's crust for mineral or petroleum deposits of economic value. The basic principles of these techniques, the interpretation of geophysical data, and their application to geology will be discussed in quantitative detail. The goals of this course are to give students an understanding of the physical principles of geophysical methods so that they will appreciate the strengths and limitations of the methods. After certain fundamentals have been mastered, the students study the procedures used in data acquisition and use the department's equipment to conduct geophysical surveys. The final phase of each section of the course gives students training in interpretation of geophysical data.

Offered every other year. Lecture 3 hours.

GEOL 2447 Geophysical Well logging

In the well logging courses, the goals are to develop an understanding of the principles and applications of well logging,  an understanding of geological lithology, unit and stratigraphic characteristics, structure geology, fault structure and other geological concepts relevant to well log analysis. We focus on the students ability the ability to interpret well logs and field analysis based upon well logs, including formation structure, fluid characteristics, production zones, and uncertainty.